Volume 5, Issue 1, June 2019, Page: 1-8
Production of Dental Inlay Wax Using Locally Sourced Materials in Enugu, Nigeria
Peter Chidiebere Okorie, Department of Dental Technology, Faculty of Health Technology and Engineering, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Enugu, Nigeria; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Taraba State University, Jalingo, Nigeria
John Emaimo, Department of Dental Technology, Faculty of Health Technology and Engineering, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Enugu, Nigeria
Cynthia Otitochukwu Aleke, Department of Dental Technology, Faculty of Health Technology and Engineering, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Enugu, Nigeria
Samuel Chinonyerem Okoronkwo, Department of Dental Technology, Faculty of Health Technology and Engineering, Federal College of Dental Technology and Therapy, Enugu, Nigeria
Godfrey Nwangwu, Dental Technology Unit, Regional Centre for Oral Health Research and Training Initiative, Jos, Nigeria
Kenneth Nkemdilim Okeke, Department of Dental Technology, School of Health Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Chibuzor Stellamaris Okonkwo, Department of Dental Technology, Shehu Idris College of Health Technology, Markfi, Nigeria
Emmanuel Chukwuma Obiano, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Taraba State University, Jalingo, Nigeria
Received: Dec. 27, 2018;       Accepted: Jan. 28, 2019;       Published: Feb. 22, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijdm.20190501.11      View  255      Downloads  56
Abstract
Dental inlay wax is a mixture of several waxes, usually containing paraffin wax, ceresin wax, beeswax and other natural and synthetic waxes. It is used to prepare patterns for gold or other metallic materials in the fabrication of inlays, crowns and bridges. Inlay wax is used for the same purpose as casting wax in the formation of pattern mostly for metallic casting in Dental technology. This study aimed at producing dental inlay wax using locally sourced materials in Enugu, Nigeria. The research was carried out between July to September, 2018 in Enugu, Nigeria. The study adopted a three phased experimental approach using the same procedures but different weight compositions. Structured, pretested Product Evaluation Data Sheet was used to evaluate the product by selected Practicing Dental Technologists in Enugu State, Nigeria. The resultant wax from experiment III with the following composition: 60g Paraffin wax, 5g Beeswax, 25g Carnauba wax, 10g Ceresin wax and (35g) of green ketchup colorant gave the best result. Its properties are comparable to the conventional Dental Inlay wax. There was significant agreement among the respondents in the smoothness of the product (40%); excellent dimensional stability and product effectiveness (40%); flow and burnout of the product (35%), and color stability of the product (45%). These findings suggests that dental inlay waxes can be produced locally in Enugu, Nigeria. Therefore, more attention needs to be paid in the production process, which will facilitate easy practice of Dental Technology, and also conserve huge foreign exchange being spent in the importation of inlay wax in Nigeria.
Keywords
Carnauba Wax, Ceresin Wax, Dental Materials, Inlay Wax, Paraffin Wax
To cite this article
Peter Chidiebere Okorie, John Emaimo, Cynthia Otitochukwu Aleke, Samuel Chinonyerem Okoronkwo, Godfrey Nwangwu, Kenneth Nkemdilim Okeke, Chibuzor Stellamaris Okonkwo, Emmanuel Chukwuma Obiano, Production of Dental Inlay Wax Using Locally Sourced Materials in Enugu, Nigeria, International Journal of Dental Medicine. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.ijdm.20190501.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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